On Local Screens The Week Of March 14 20

Heads Up

Alisa Yang Showcase and Discussion — Caldera, BendFilm and ScaleHouse celebrate Bend Women’s March with Alisa Yang, an interdisciplinary artist and filmmaker currently in residence at Caldera. Includes screenings of three of Yang’s films, readings from Yang and Q&A with BendFilm executive director Todd Looby. This event is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Sunday at At Liberty in Bend. Cost is $5 (tickets at BendFilm.org.) Running times unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

“Boy Erased” — The son of a Baptist preacher (Lucas Hedges) is forced to participate in a church-supported gay conversion program after being outed to his parents (Nicole Kidman and Joel Edgerton). This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Rodriguez Annex, Jefferson County Library in Madras. Free. 115 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Exhibition on Screen: The Impressionists and the Man Who Made Them” — Who were Monet, Cezanne, Degas, Renoir and their contemporaries? Why and how exactly did they paint? This film explores a major exhibition focusing on impressionist artists and the man credited with inventing impressionism as we know it: 19th century Parisian art collector Paul Durand-Ruel. This film screens at 7:15 p.m. Tuesday at Sisters Movie House. Cost is $12.50. 85 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Sisters Movie House

Fate/Stay Night: [Heaven’s Feel] II. Lost Butterfly — In the latest installment of the anime “Fate” series, the heroes fight for the Holy Grail. This film screens at 7 p.m. Thursday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 plus fees. 130 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Gone With the Wind” 80th Anniversary — In this epic tale set on the eve of the American Civil War, Scarlett O’Hara (Vivian Leigh) is rich, beautiful and self-centered. But as the war devastates the South, Scarlett discovers the strength within herself to protect her family and rebuild her life. This film screens at 1 p.m. Sunday and 6 p.m. Monday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 plus fees. 240 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“The Human Element” — Photographer and explorer James Balog investigates often overlooked victims of climate change from a fishing community facing the imminent reality of sea level rise, to unemployed coal miners in Kentucky. He explores whether the human element can help bring the whole system of nature back into balance. This film screens at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at The Environmental Center in Bend. Free. 76 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

In Case You Missed It: “Meow Wolf: Origin Story” — The documentary follows a group of disenfranchised artists in Santa Fe, New Mexico and their immersive, large-scale exhibitions that crack open a profitable niche in the arts and entertainment industry. When they spark the interest of George R.R. Martin and receive his support to take over an old bowling alley, they build a massive exhibition with the help of more than 140 artists. A panel discussion will follow the screening. This film screens at 5:15 p.m. Monday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School. Cost is $12. 88 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

“Jimi Hendrix Electric Church” Encore — This documentary includes footage of the legendary guitarist at his July 4, 1970, concert at the Atlanta Pop Festival. It also traces his journey to the festival amid the shadow of civil rights unrest and a burgeoning festival culture. This film screens at 7:15 p.m. Sunday at Sisters Movie House. Cost is $10.25 and due to the recent snow, the theater will also honor tickets purchased previously for the Feb. 26 screening. 89 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Sisters Movie House

“Made in Abyss: Journey’s Dawn” — In this anime adventure, Riko and her plucky band of friends dream of one day becoming Cave Raiders — exalted adventurers who brave the treacherous descent into the enigmatic Abyss. Includes behind the scenes footage. This film screens at 7 p.m. Wednesday in Japanese with English subtitles at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 plus fees. 135 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

Montana Fishing Film Festival — A showcase of Rocky Mountain fly fishing films. These films screen at 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m. at 10 Barrel Brewing Co. East in Bend. Cost is $15 (tickets at eventbrite.com.) Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from 10 Barrel Brewing Co.

No Man’s Land Film Festival — 13 short outdoor adventure films showcasing women in pursuit of the radical. These films screen at 7 p.m. Friday at the Tower Theater in Bend. Cost is $15 general admission or $13 for BendFilm members (tickets at bendfilm.org.) 80 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

“Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy” — Rocked by questions about his faith, filmmaker Timothy Mahoney seeks scientific evidence that Moses actually wrote the first books of the Bible, despite the skepticism of mainstream scholars. A panel discussion will follow the film. This film screens at 6:30 p.m. Thursday and Tuesday, and 12:55 p.m. Saturday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 plus fees. 140 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Salvador Dalí: In Search of Immortality” Encore— This documentary journeys through the life and work of Salvador Dalí and his muse, Gala, from 1929 as he joined the surrealist group, through his death in 1989. This film screens at 5 p.m. Sunday at Sisters Movie House. Cost is $12.50 and due to the recent snow, the theater will also honor tickets purchased previously for the March 5 screening. 100 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Sisters Movie House

WHAT’S NEW

“Captive State” (star rating unavailable) Set in a Chicago neighborhood nearly a decade after an occupation by an extra-terrestrial force, this film explores lives on both sides of the conflict — the collaborators and the dissidents. Stars John Goodman, Vera Farmiga, Aston Sanders and Jonathan Majors. 109 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Climax” () When the hip-hop dance troupe at the center of director Gaspar Noe’s film performs a number bursting with originality and sexuality, it’s seriously great stuff. But the more they talk and expose themselves as vapid and calculating, the less we care about their fates. 96 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Five Feet Apart” (star rating unavailable) The story of Stella (Haley Lu Richardson) and Will (Cole Sprouse), two young people who are forbidden to touch due to their serious medical conditions, but refuse to be defined by the obstacles that separate them. Based on the New York Times bestselling novel by Rachael Lippincott with Mikki Daughtry and Tobias Laconis. 120 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Ruben Brandt, Collector” () A wild, inventive ride through the unconscious, by way of Art History 101 and An Introduction to Film Tropes. Overplotted, convoluted and self-consciously weird, it takes viewers on a whirligig tour through a carefully aestheticized dreamscape and feels like a sneakily pretentious pastiche, and not much else. 96 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, Washington Post

“Wrestle” (star rating unavailable) A superb sports documentary about a Huntsville, Ala., high school wrestling team that expertly balances two points of view, the athletic and the cultural. “Wrestle” conveys a fine sense of this intense, demanding, almost gladiatorial sport, nakedly nerve-wracking and insisting on total mental and physical preparedness.96 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Kenneth Turan,

Los Angeles Times

“Wonder Park” (star rating unavailable) This animated adventure comedy tells the story of a magnificent amusement park where the imagination of a wildly creative girl named June comes alive. Features the voices of Sofia Mali, Jennifer Garner, Kenan Thompson, Mila Kunis, John Oliver, Ken Jeong and Matthew Broderick. 86 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

STILL SHOWING

“Aquaman” () The saving grace of this reasonably entertaining and sometimes truly ridiculous origin story is that everyone seems to get the sheer, waterlogged lunacy of the concept, so why not have fun with it? 143 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roper,

Chicago Sun-Times

“Alita: Battle Angel” () Rescued cyborg Alita (Rosa Salazar) is a blank slate and experiences everything in post-apocalyptic Iron City with a childlike wonder. She also possesses unique fighting skills, which she puts to use defending her loved ones. Director, Robert Rodriguez brings a go-for-broke sense of world-building, but the film is failed by the weak script, tonal inconsistencies and poorly written characters. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Apollo 11” () This documentary about the people who pulled off the spectacular feat of sending Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins to the moon in 1969 doesn’t profess to offer new information or insights. What it does offer is a wealth of fresh images and sound, assembled into an immersive IMAX journey by director and editor Todd Douglas Miller. It’s a more visceral trip than any moviegoer — even the armchair experts — has ever taken before. 93 minutes. (G)

— Mark Jenkins, The Washington Post

“Arctic” () In this gripping, taciturn and wintry film, Overgård (Mads Mikkelsen), has survived a plane crash in a punishing polar landscape. But when the rescue helicopter goes down, he decides to hike to a seasonal way-station in the hopes of saving himself and the badly injured female co-pilot (Maria Thelma Smáradóttir). 97 minutes. (PG-`13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Captain Marvel” () A plucky and pleasing, if predictable, excursion. Vers (Brie Larson), is a member of an extraterrestrial race of noble warrior heroes known as the Kree who is fighting the lizardy green Skrull aliens when she crashes on Earth in the mid-‘90s. She makes an unlikely ally and friend in Special Agent Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and discovers through her hazy memories that she is Carol Danvers, a hot shot Air Force pilot who disappeared in a test flight crash six years ago. This film also screens in 3D and IMAX. 124 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

CatVideoFest 2019 (star rating unavailable) A compilation of the latest, best cat videos culled from countless hours of unique submissions and sourced animations, music videos and classic internet powerhouses. Benefits the Furry Friends Foundation in Sisters. 70 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from CatVideoFest

“Cold War” () This gorgeously fatalistic love story begins in Communist Poland and spans 15 years and several countries across postwar Europe. The movie is fueled by the easy, charismatic chemistry of its stars: Tomasz Kot and especially Joanna Kulig. The exiles belong together and yet they’re impossible together. “Cold War” believes in their beautiful disaster of a love story to the end. 88 minutes. (R)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“Fighting With My Family” () This sports biopic is an underdog fable based on the true story of a scrappy Norwich, England, wrestling clan. The superb Florence Pugh portrays the World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc., star known as Paige . Nick Frost and Lena Headey play the heads of this wrestling clan and Jack Lowden captures the essence of thwarted ambition as Saraya’s brother Zak. 108 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“Green Book” () Viggo Mortensen plays a thick-headed lunk from the Bronx and Mahershala Ali is the musician he’s driving through the South in 1962, and both are nothing but believable. This is a friendship story and one of the best times I’ve had at the movies this year. 130 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Greta” () When a handbag is left on a New York subway seat the only person who might possibly pick it up and return it back to the owner would be Frances (Chloë Grace Moretz), who toddles innocently into the glamorous web of Greta (Isabelle Huppert). Neil Jordan’s cheeky and deliciously demented take on a paranoid horror thriller is rich, lush and gorgeously crafted. 98 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” () The third film in this animated franchise is as emotionally moving as it is beautifully made. Hiccup (Jay Baruchel) is now the Viking chief of his homeland, Berk, where humans and dragons live in harmony. But that idyll is threatened by dragon hunter Grimmel (F. Murray Abraham), who has his sights set on the last Night Fury dragon, Toothless. 104 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Isn’t It Romantic” () A visually and verbally ingenious sendup of romantic comedies. Natalie (Rebel Wilson), an entry-level architect at a New York firm where everyone takes advantage of her, wakes up after a mugging in an alternate universe and suddenly, she’s the star of her own rom-com. But rather than take delight in this new world, she feels instantly trapped. 88 minutes. (PG-13)

— Jane Horwitz, The Washington Post

“The Kid” () In this outlandish and original take on an Old West legend, a boy on the run crosses paths with lawman Pat Garrett (Ethan Hawke) and Garrett’s longtime adversary, Billy the Kid (Dane DeHaan, milking every moment), and their journeys become inextricably linked. 99 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part” () A candy-colored sugar rush with a nonstop parade of pop culture references, famous cameos and inside jokes, “The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part” doesn’t quite match the original’s spark and creativity, but it’s a worthy chapter in the ever-expanding Lego movie universe. 93 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Mary Poppins Returns” () While it would be all but impossible to match one of the most beloved and acclaimed musicals of all time, “Mary Poppins Returns” is a sequel worthy of the name. Emily Blunt is sensational, along with a stellar supporting cast including Lin-Manuel Miranda, in this wall-to-wall smile of a movie: big of heart and large in scale, brimming with show-stopping musical numbers. 130 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Run the Race” (star rating unavailable) Reeling from his mother’s death and his father’s abandonment, Zach Truett (Tanner Stine), an All-State athlete, finds glory on the football field, working to earn a college scholarship and a ticket out of town for himself and his brother David (Evan Hofer). When a devastating injury puts Zach and his dreams on the sidelines, David laces up his track cleats to salvage their future and point Zach toward hope. 101 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse () The best “Spider-Man” movie yet, and one of the best 2018 films of any kind, is peppered with clever visual touches and crackling good inside jokes. The story about a new Spidey meeting versions of the character in alternate universes is a brilliant, exuberant, soaring and original adventure. 117 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Stan & Ollie” () Thanks to the subtle brilliance of Steve Coogan as Stan Laurel and John C. Reilly as Oliver Hardy, even someone who’s never heard of the 1930s movie comedy duo likely would see how magical these two were together. This Hollywood biopic is sweet-natured, occasionally melancholy and thoroughly entertaining. 97 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Time

“A Star is Born” () In his directorial debut, Bradley Cooper (also the leading man) strikes the perfect balance between a showbiz fable and an intimate story with universal truths. As the protege who rockets to fame, Lady Gaga is a winning, natural presence, even in the scenes where she’s nowhere near a piano or a microphone. 136 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“They Shall Not Grow Old” () A remarkable new documentary from director Peter Jackson that uses restored footage and oral histories recorded by British veterans to tell the story of the men who fought in World War I . It’s an unexpectedly contemporary-feeling experience and a portrait of humanity and inhumanity. 99 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Tyler Perry’s A Madea Family Funeral” (star rating unavailable) A joyous family reunion turns into a hilarious nightmare as Madea (Tyler Perry) and the crew travel to backwoods Georgia and unexpectedly plan a funeral, which threatens to reveal sordid family secrets. 109 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“The Upside” () Parolee Dell (Kevin Hart) stumbles into a job as the “life auxiliary” to an uber-wealthy quadriplegic man (Bryan Cranston). Their chemistry is easy, unlike the forced bits and riffs, weak writing and shaky character transitions that bedevil the rest of the film. It’s a struggle to find the bright side to this rather hackneyed film. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“What Men Want” () With impeccable comedic timing, Taraji P. Henson is the primary reason why this cheerfully bawdy remake of the Mel Gibson hit “What Women Want” is consistently funny and entertaining. 117 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

Source : https://www.bendbulletin.com/entertainment/go/7006867-151/on-local-screens-the-week-of-march-14-20

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