‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

Despite the box office success of superhero films and the depth of a few source material, most of these films are considered as shallow, mindless movies without any serious characterization. This assessment simply is not true. Superheroes could be complex characters with well-defined personalities, and also the right actors and actresses brings these personalities someone's on the big screen. As five films demonstrate, playing roles that originate in comics would not diminish actors'credibility. They still consider the roles and characters seriously, even when dealing with outlandish premises. In "Watchmen," Jackie Earle Haley literally sociopathic vigilante Walter Kovacs, also known as Rorschach. From the 1st lines on the film, viewers get a particular peek at Rorschach's unhinged personality from his monologue with regards to the decaying morality of New York City and, by extension, the other world. Kovacs is inwardly tortured and angry at both himself and society, and he sizzling hot he knows of to manage this anger should be to hunt those he sees as criminals. The scene during which he fully discards his civilian identity as Rorschach serves as an example: Haley makes Kovacs visibly shiver with anger at Blair Roche's brutal death while he exacts justice for the murderer. Another scene, where Kovacs is in prison after being apprehended, shows how contemptuous he or she is of criminals even as he is seemingly at their mercy.

Yesterday in a press conference and speech in North Dakota, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump announced what some are terming his energy policy. His announcement was extremely short on specifics, included factual inaccuracies, and in some cases contained obvious internal contradictions. As such, what he said might better be termed "energy aspirations." We'll have to wait for the details to see how these aspirations might eventually lead to policy.

What were those aspirations? There were two related themes in the announcements: extraction is good, and regulations are bad because they tend to limit extraction. So Trump will get rid of a lot of the latter in order to boost the former. But, at the same time, he'll preserve our air, water, and natural resources.

At one point, Trump estimated that "75 percent of our rules and regulations are bad for us." So he'd get rid of most of them: "Any regulation that's outdated, unnecessary, bad for workers, or contrary to the national interest will be scrapped, and scrapped completely." Lest there be any confusion about whose rules were problematic, he went on to accuse the Environmental Protection Agency of using "totalitarian tactics" and accused the Obama administration of blocking extraction.

There's a small problem with that narrative: under the Obama administration, the US has become the world's single largest producer of oil and natural gas. To sustain this criticism, Trump had to find a statistic that sounded bad; he settled on blaming Obama for "the lowest oil rig count," even though that clearly has no relationship to production.

This sort of cognitive dissonance pervaded the speech. Trump promised to make US energy independent and free from international markets yet at the same time promised to approve the Keystone pipeline, which would bring in oil from another country. His promised approval got applause from the crowd in North Dakota even though the Canadian oil would be competing with their own local production.

Trump promised to make US energy free from international markets, yet at the same time promised to bring in oil from another country.

Regarding other extractive industries, Trump claimed that "We're going to save the coal industry." When a reporter pointed out that coal is dying largely because of cheap wind and natural gas, as well as falling foreign demand, Trump claimed coal would be much cheaper and therefore more competitive if there were less regulation. "All I can do is free up the coal, and that's what I'm going to do," he responded.

When speaking of renewable energy sources, Trump basically said we'd use them, but they're terrible. After claiming "I know a lot about solar," Trump went on to say it had a 30-year payback time, which is simply false except for some very specific and rare circumstances. Unsubsidized wind power, which is cheaper than coal in many areas of the country, was also targeted. "Wind is very expensive—without subsidy, wind doesn't work," Trump misstated, before saying, "You go to various places in California, it's killing all the eagles."

Eagles, then, would seem to be in the "real" category in Trump's statement, “We’re going to deal with real environmental challenges, not the phony ones we’ve been hearing about.” Although he never said so explicitly, climate change appears to be in the phony category, based on his intended policy changes.

"We're going to rescind all the job-destroying Obama executive actions, including the Climate Action Plan," Trump promised. But he apparently doesn't know what the Climate Action Plan is, since earlier he had claimed it was cap-and-trade (it will include that only if states choose to implement emissions reductions that way). In any case, given that the EPA has already made an endangerment finding under the Clean Air Act, it's not clear Trump would have the legal authority to stop these emissions limits.

Everything in this set of announcements needs clarification.

Similarly, he claimed the Paris climate agreement—which he'd also back out of—would give foreign bureaucrats the ability to control US energy policy. In reality, the agreement calls for each nation to individually craft and implement its own plan for controlling carbon emissions.

As for the 25 percent of regulations that would remain in a Trump administration, they would be modified based on "trust [in] local officials and local residents." Businesses generally hate this, as it's a recipe for facing a patchwork of regulations rather than a single set of nationwide standards. Yet Trump has also claimed that he'll provide the exact opposite: regulatory certainty for industry, something he said was very important.

Despite getting rid of most regulations, Trump promised that clean air and water would be priorities (something the local officials he praised have frequently been indifferent to), and he'd preserve our natural beauty. But he also promised he'd preserve our wealth of fossil fuel resources, while at the same time arranging to extract them as quickly as possible. This may mean that his definition of "preserve" needs clarification.

But everything in this set of announcements needs clarification. It has become normal for politicians to over promise during the campaign and even to take positions that are at variance with reality should those play well with the voters. But the frequency of those instances in these announcements, along with the large number of times the promises are incompatible with each other, means that there's nothing here that approaches a policy.

In "The Mighty Thor," another superhero movie, Chris Hemsworth brings the Norse mythological god of thunder to life. Exiled from Asgard on account of his arrogance, Thor has to regain Odin's favor and his very own powers to handle trickster god Loki. Hemsworth portrays Thor's difficulty in acclamating yourself with Midgard/Earth inside a diner scene: the Asgardian custom of slamming a mug available to show appreciation is humorous to the audience and in-character for Thor, but it's off-putting for Jane Foster (played by Natalie Portman) and also the other humans. Through this and other scenes, viewers discover how awkward Thor is and perceive his disoriented confusion, which ends up in violence after she has first landed on Earth. Thor attacks everyone within a rage, unable to accept that they have temporarily become fully human. Throughout the film, Thor gets to be more accustomed to being among humans, an improvement that is reflected in his natural conversations with Jane Foster and Erik Selvig (Stellan Skarsgard). In the trilogy of films that is called for him, the half-breed vampire hunter Blade represents another type of a well-played comic strip hero. Acted by Wesley Snipes, this character is gritty yet stylish, perhaps to supply a contrast to the angst-ridden literary vampires who were previously popular. Snipes participates in intense action sequences with similar stoicism viewers would expect of the reality-based superhero, slacking to produce witty profanity-laced one-liners. And also the X-Men and Spider-Man, Blade was one of the first superheroes to make the large screen. The 1989 "Batman" film features Michael Keaton as being the Caped Crusader in amongst his preferred adaptations. Although Christian Bale's performance in "The Dark Knight Trilogy" is widely praised, many viewers criticized the gravelly voice Bale uses when playing Batman, claiming commemorate it harder to use him seriously. Keaton plays Batman more suavely, striking a blend between your dark, serious Bale plus the lighthearted Adam West with the 1960s movies. In short, Keaton plays the role of Batman naturally rather then being a deliberately adopted persona.

Source : https://arstechnica.com/science/2016/05/donald-trumps-energy-plan-everything-but-the-pet-unicorn/

Finally, one of the better superhero movie performances for all time goes to some villain: the Joker in "The Dark Knight." Heath Ledger's take about the iconic Batman villain brings the Joker's menace, macabre humor, and passion for chaos in a single package that is best illustrated within the chilling "magic trick" scene during which he gouges out a mobster's eye using a pencil. The Joker finds as perpetually filled with nervous energy and near violence. Small mannerisms like constantly licking his lips and nervously doing your research, in addition to the menacing voice Ledger developed, get this to Joker one among Batman fans'favorites. These actors in no way provide the only real five samples of nuanced acting in superhero films. "Captain America: The First Avenger" has Chris Evans as a difficult but well-meaning superhero, "Spider-Man" has Toby MacGuire portraying essentially the most well-known adaptation of Peter Parker, and "Iron Man" provides the snarky and suave Tony Stark played by Robert Downey Jr. While comic films may seem like shallow entertainment, actors can participate in the roles good enough in making audiences suspend their disbelief.

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‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

Source:Ars Technica

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

Source:Salon

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

Source:ThinkProgress

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

Source:The Raw Story

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

Source:nytimes.com

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

Source:New York Post

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.

Source:NPR

‘I Will Give You Everything.’ Here Are 282 Of Donald Trump’s Campaign Promises.